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Posted inAlbania, Serbia, Southeastern Europe

Serbia: Milosevic Backtracks

WITH HIS 1994 NEW Year’s address, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic appeared to be undertaking an image overhaul. He played down the ultranationalist rhetoric that helped trigger the collapse of socialist Yugoslavia and the bloodshed throughout the former Yugoslavia and tried to portray himself as sincerely dedicated to the cause of regional peace.1 But in 1995, Milosevic has cautiously begun reviving his reputation as the ultranationalist leader of the Serbs. Will Milosevic return to the nationalist firebrand persona that propelled him to political prominence in the late 1980s, or will he attempt somehow to balance or fuse it with his new, carefully crafted peacemaker image?