by Irina Busygina Federalism is widely seen as one of Russia’s most successful reforms. Beginning with the Federation Treaty in 1992 and continuing with the 1993 constitution, a three-tired structure was created –republics; krais and major cities; autonomous okrugs and oblasts–with complicated and often contradictory mechanisms for sharing power among them. Yet serious tensions remain. […]

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