1 March 1986 In the aftermath of the dramatic Communist partisan victory that gave them control of Yugoslavia in October 1944, Milovan Djilas became one of the three aides closest to Tito; he witnessed revolutionaries becoming rulers, conferred with Stalin, and confronted him at the historic meeting that led to the break with Moscow. Ten […]

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