You can read five articles for free this month if you register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more articles every month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You are reading the last article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read 5 articles from the past month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have one more article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have 2 more articles for free this month if you don't register.

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

Accessing the site via a library or a company subscription? There's no need to register but you may need to contact your institution to obtain login details. Dismiss this message by clicking "X Close" button.

Posted inEuropean Union, Slovenia, Southeastern Europe

Slovenia: Making steady Gains in Foreign Policy

THIS MAY PROVE A WATERshed year for Slovenian foreign policy.1 Ljubljana has scored a series of foreign policy gains under Foreign Minister Zoran Thaler’s guidance, particularly in bilateral relations with neighboring Italy.2 Thaler, a member of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDS) – which is part of the governing coalition – assumed his post in January, replacing Lojze Peterle, who tendered his resignation in fall 1994 after a series of long-standing disagreements with other government members. Whether Thaler’s diplomatic skills and overall strategies were crucial to Slovenia’s recent foreign policy gains – and whether his achievements will prove irreversible – remains to be seen. What is beyond doubt, however, is that the new minister’s personality and management style are assets to his department’s work – and perhaps to his country’s goal of integration into Western political and economic structures.