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Posted inCentral Europe & Baltics, Eastern Europe & Russia, Lithuania, Russia

Lithuania Military: Compromise At the Crossroads

IN A COMPROMISE SOLUTION to the long-disputed problem of Russian military transit to and from the Kaliningrad region, Lithuania has extended through 1995 the military transit regulations that expired at the end of last year. In return, Russia implemented the economic trade treaty granting Lithuania most favored nation (MFN) status, which had been signed 14 months before the January transit agreement was reached. Both sides made concessions in the agreement. Despite repeated and adamant assertions by President Algirdas Brazauskas and Prime Minister Adolfas Slezevicius that all countries, including Russia, would have to abide by new October 1994 regulations on dangerous and military cargoes, Lithuania retained the less restrictive former rules for Russian transports. The extended transit rules were originally established in November 1993 for the movement of Russian armed forces withdrawn from Germany; the regulations had also been applied to Russian military transit from Kaliningrad. Russia, in turn, modified its demand for a formal treaty on military transit.