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Posted inCentral Europe & Baltics

Overhauling an Alliance

In the early 1990s, Ronald Asmus was one of the first to advocate that NATO enlargement “was the logical continuation of the policies that the U.S. had pursued throughout the post-war period, and that it was necessary not only to stabilize Central and Eastern Europe but to ensure that NATO remained relevant and survived,” he writes in his recent book, Opening NATO’s Door.