You can read five articles for free this month if you register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more articles every month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You are reading the last article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read 5 articles from the past month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have one more article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have 2 more articles for free this month if you don't register.

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

Accessing the site via a library or a company subscription? There's no need to register but you may need to contact your institution to obtain login details. Dismiss this message by clicking "X Close" button.

Posted inBelarus, Central Europe & Baltics, Eastern Europe & Russia, Russia

Belarus: Business as Usual With Lukashenka

BELARUSIAN PRESIDENT Alyaksandr Lukashenka’s actions in his first months in office were as contradictory as his campaign pledges. He made moves toward implementing market economic reforms, despite campaign promises to halt privatization. On several occasions, he appeared willing to concede almost anything to Russia; on others, he defended Belarusian interests. He chose a medley of conservatives and reformers, new and old guard, to serve as his advisers. Although he ran for office on an anti-corruption ticket, members of his administration were later accused of abuse of office. Some of Lukashenka’s supporters have become disillusioned with the president, and several former rivals have won appointments in governing bodies.