You can read five articles for free this month if you register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more articles every month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You are reading the last article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read 5 articles from the past month.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have one more article for free this month if you don't register

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

You have 2 more articles for free this month if you don't register.

REGISTER NOW

Register for free to read more.
Find out about our membership plans.

Already a member? Please log in here.

Accessing the site via a library or a company subscription? There's no need to register but you may need to contact your institution to obtain login details. Dismiss this message by clicking "X Close" button.

Posted inEastern Europe & Russia, Ukraine

Ukraine: The Shifting Political Landscape

SEVERAL MONTHS OF STRUGGLE AND heated debate in Ukraine brought compromise during the first week of June, when President Leonid Kuchma and the parliament resolved a deadlock over a law on separation of powers. The so-called constitutional agreement, which would give the president greater executive powers over political and economic reforms, was signed only after the president threatened a legally non-binding plebiscite on confidence in himself and the parliament. Before the parliament approved the agreement – an important victory for the president – Kuchma told deputies that there was little choice: “Either we work together, or I turn to the people in a national referendum.”